Winlaton

Winlaton

186 Springvale Road

Nunawading

VIC

Australia

Provider: Victorian Government

Year Opened: 1956

Year Closed: 1991

 

Click here to read an article from the Eureka Street Magazine (4th August 2013) about the treatment of girls at this Home.

Click here to read an article from The Age (7th June 2002) about CLAN Member Valda’s treatment at this Home.

The cottages in Winlaton were:

  • Goonyah
  • Warrina
  • Kooringal
  • Image and updated information courtesy to Lynn.

CLAN Homes – Orphanages Gallery

There are currently no other images available for CLAN members to view for this Home. If you have any images and would like to donate them, please contact CLAN.

CLAN Museum Gallery

There are currently no images of historical items available for CLAN members to view for this Home. If you have any historical items and would like to donate them, please contact CLAN.

CLAN library books where this Home is mentioned include:

VIC 246
Little Lois Davis barely knew her mother. In an orphanage at the age of three months, her childhood featured too many institutions and not enough nurturing. Determined that her past wouldn’t decide her future, Lois changed her name and, as Donna, became an international model and the mother of two beautiful children.  After the break-up of her marriage, she became involved with a charismatic young man who asked her to do the seemingly unthinkable – smuggle drugs into Australia from India and risk everything she had worked so hard for. Emotionally vulnerable, Donna reluctantly agreed and found herself a criminal. Pregnant and alone, she would nearly have to pay the most terrible price of all – the loss of her children.

VIC 252
Under a blanket of suppression orders, a man in his late sixties was quietly arrested, charged – and later convicted – for the systematic rape, abuse and imprisonment of his only daughter, ‘Katherine’, which spanned decades. He fathered four of her children.
Until recently, this shocking story had been buried under a complex legal web and Katherine’s insistence on silence so that she could rebuild her shattered life and protect her children. In Behind Closed Doors, Katherine speaks out and tells the story of how she survived – and how such degrading abuse went unnoticed for so long.
Now, a new epilogue reveals the evidence Katherine gave at the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse, detailing the betrayal she felt at having been ignored for so long.